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Stormy week doesn’t deter the dolphins!

Dolphins were sighted every day and on most of our cruises during the 2nd week of May.  The South West experienced severe weather – strong winds and heavy rain – mid week for a few days.  A total of 56.6mm of rain was recorded in the Mandurah area for the week and temperatures were around the 20 degree mark.  On 7th May dolphins sighted on our cruises were all heading towards the Peel Inlet.  There was stormy weather heading our way and so this may be a possible reason as to why the dolphins were heading into the Peel Inlet – calmer waterways.  On many occasions this week the dolphins sighted were rounding up and chasing fish at impressive speeds.  Working together – rounding up fish is one of the most common methods of feeding that the dolphins use.  Pods of dolphins work together to trap schools of fish by rounding them up and then diving into the middle and attacking from all sides to feed.  The fish are stunned so they are easier to catch this way.  What may surprise you is that dolphins don’t use their teeth to eat their food.  They do have teeth, however that allows them to grasp food.  When feeding they swallow their food whole and head first!  If dolphins have enough food where they reside and the temperature of the water is also acceptable they don’t tend to migrate and that is why Mandurah has such a strong dolphin population!  When dolphins were sighted in the wetland areas at the end of the week, a large number of birds were also sighted in these areas.  The high level of rain and wind we experienced the few days past washed a lot of food into the water and onto the land which is ideal for bird life.  Dolphins joined us for a ride on our boat’s waves many times through the week.  On 12th May a cheeky pod of dolphins that joined us for a ride were getting that much air time, they were heavily splashing down and wetting our guests on board!  On 6th May a pod of dolphins were also sighted jumping vertically out of the water and chasing each other which was quite spectacular.  As we got closer to them they swam over to our boat and joined us to Stingray Point for a surf on our boat’s waves. 

6th May – On our 11am cruise 4 dolphins were sighted at the entrance to the Mandurah Ocean Marina searching for food.  They weren’t in a very active mood, rather they were just “plodding along”.  We cruised alongside them as they went about their way.  Our 12 noon cruise sighted these same 4 dolphins in the same area.  They were jumping vertically out of the water and chasing each other.  It was quite spectacular.  As we got closer to them they swam over to our boat and joined us to Stingray Point for a surf on our boat’s waves.  These same 4 dolphins were also sighted on our 1pm cruise back at the Mandurah Ocean Marina entrance.  There must have been a lot of fish hanging around this area to keep drawing them back there.  Again they were searching for food, rounding up fish and just “chilling out”, living the lesuirley life of a dolphin.  No dolphins were sighted along our cruise route on our afternoon cruises.

mandurah cruises dolphin

mandurah cruises dolphin

7th May –  4 dolphins were sighted on our 12 noon cruise near the New Mandurah Estuary Bridge casually swimming along towards the Peel Inlet.  On our approach they joined us for a surf on our boat’s waves.  On our 1pm cruise 2 dolphins were sighted in the main channel near Stingray Point also casually swimming along towards the Peel Inlet.  On our approach they joined us for a ride under our boat’s bow to the Old Mandurah Traffic Bridge.  There was stormy weather heading our way and so this may be a possible reason as to why the dolphins were heading into the Peel Inlet – calmer waterways.

mandurah cruises dolphin

mandurah cruises dolphin

8th May –  This day was the start of severe weather in the West.  We experienced strong winds and 25.8mm of rain so we only had the one cruise for the day.  Our 12 noon cruise sighted 4 dolphins in the Port Mandurah Canals rounding up fish.  They were reaching some very impressive speeds when doing so and putting on a great show for our guests on board as we observed them from nearby.   

mandurah cruises dolphin

9th May –  This was day 2 of severe weather in the West.  We experienced strong winds and 11.2mm of rain so we only had the two cruises for the day.  On our 12 noon cruise 3 dolphins were sighted near the entrance to the Peel Inlet.  They were searching for food in the shallows of the wetlands.  A large number of birds were also feeding in the wetland areas.  The high level of rain and wind we experienced the past few days washed a lot of food into the water and onto the land which is ideal for bird life.  No dolphins were sighted on our 2pm cruise. 

 mandurah cruises dolphin

10th May –  This was day 3 of severe weather in the West.  We experienced strong winds and 7.2mm of rain so we only had the two cruises for the day.  A lone male dolphin was sighted on our 12 noon cruise near Stingray Point searching for food.  It swam past us before turning back around to join us for a swim alongside our boat towards the Mandurah Ocean Marina.  No dolphins were sighted on our 2pm cruise.
 

mandurah cruises dolphin

mandurah cruises dolphin

11th May –  The weather started to fine up this day.  We still experienced 8.4mm of rain however the sun was starting to peak out from behind the clouds and the wind settled down.  Our 11am cruise sighted 5 dolphins in the Port Mandurah Canals swimming past all the luxurious homes, searching for food.  2 of the dolphins in this pod were young calves born this summer.  We cruised alongside this pod as they went about their way.  3 dolphins were sighted along the shallows of Fairbridge Road searching for some lunch on our 12 noon cruise.  They were too busy to be interested in joining us for a ride on our boat’s waves and bow and so we observed them from nearby.  On our 4pm cruise 7 dolphins were sighted along the shallows of the Eastern Foreshore.  They were chasing and rounding up fish, furiously diving and thrashing around.  They put on a great show for our guests on board as we observed them from nearby.       

mandurah cruises dolphin

mandurah cruises dolphin

12th May – On our 10am cruise 5 dolphins were sighted near the New Mandurah Estuary Bridge.  They were playing around, chasing each other and on our approach they were quick to swim over to our boat.  They joined us for a surf on our boat’s waves to the Peel Inlet and then turned around and stayed with us until we entered the Port Mandurah Canals.  During their time with us they got some very impressive air time and on a few occasions made that big of a splash they wet our guests onboard.  Our 11am cruise sighted 6 dolphins in stage 2 of the Port Mandurah Canals casually swimming along.  On our approach they swam over to our boat and joined us for a ride under our bow and in the little bit of a wave on the side.  They stayed with us to the shallows of Fairbridge Road before they were distracted by passing fish.  4 dolphins were sighted on our 12 noon cruise along the shallows of the Eastern Foreshore.  They were having what our hostess referred to as a “lazy afternoon swim” and we cruised alongside them as they did so.  On our 1pm cruise the same pod of 6 dolphins we sighted on our 11am cruise were now sighted just out of Mandjar Bay.  They were swimming along slowly and searching for some lunch.  Our 2 pm cruise sighted 3 dolphins searching for food around the northern Port Mandurah Canal Entrance.  They were too busy to be interested in us and so we observed them from nearby as they went about their way.  4 dolphins were sighted on our 3pm cruise in Mandjar Bay.  This was the same pod from our 12 noon cruise still casually swimming along searching for some food.   

mandurah cruises dolphin

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There were many photos and videos taken during this week and we get them up on our website and Facebook page soon.

We also encourage you to share your sightings, photos and videos on our Facebook page!

https://www.facebook.com/MandurahCruises

And remember, if you would like to join us on a cruise and see Mandurah dolphins just visit the 1hr Dolphin & Canal Cruise page for more info and to book online.

http://mandurahcruises.com.au/

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WJHG-TV, channel 7 (the NBC affiliate for Panama City, Florida) posted the following article and video:

http://www.wjhg.com/home/headlines/Did-a-Dolpin-Discover-A-Womans-Cancer–207363771.html#.UZJIrt6Q_IU

The article and video tell the following story:

A woman went on a dolphin excursion when on holidays in the British Virgin Islands.  When swimming with the dolphins a particular dolphin by the name of Keppler  kept running into her.  The dolphin trainer told her that the dolphin detected something wrong with her.  A week later she had pains in her chest.  She remembered the strange dolphin encounter and went to see her doctor. They found a spot on her lung and she was diagnosed with lung cancer.  “Thank God to this little dolphin, Keppler, who lives in the British Virgin Islands. He saved my life.” She said.  Dolphins have been known to detect certain types of cancer and pregnancy in some people!

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Mandurah Weather

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Wednesday
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Mandurah’s Dolphins

Mandurah has a healthy population of Bottle Nose Dolphins (tusiops truncatus) that is estimated to number up to 75 individuals, depending on the time of year. The number increases around mating times when males come in and join the pods. The pods of dolphins average around 10-15 and have sometimes been seen to be as large as 25 down to solitary dolphins or smaller family groups of 3-4.

Their average length is about 3 metres, with calves being about 1 metre long at birth. We normally see baby dolphins appear between December and April. Mandurah's wild dolphins are medium grey in colour with light flanks and pale bellies. They can live up to 30 years and can swim in short bursts up to 40km/h and they love to play in our ferries bow waves and wash. As a matter of fact dolphins are the only other mammals apart from humans that continue to play well into their adult life. And Mandurah's wild dolphins are very playful!

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